Slow Brain Waves Play Key Role in Coordinating Complex Activity

.

Saturday, September 16th, 2006

.

Researchers at UC Berkeley are trying to discover how different regions of the brain operate in concert with each other, dispite no obvious lines of communication. Their results showe that the slow Theta waves in separate regions of the brain lock in phase, or synchronize. This Theta synchronization essentially “tunes in”, or manipulates the higher-frequency waves that transfer information, which allows for the coordination of their activity and orchestration of complex actions.

.

berkeley

.

Slow Your Brainwaves for Creativity

.

October 16th, 2006 A neuroscientist claims he can unleash creativity by boosting low-frequency brainwaves, and he’s tested the theory on 100 students at the Royal College of Music.

.

According to an exhibition at the Science Museum in London, the brain can be trained to slow itself down and, by doing so, lift musicians performances by at least one grade.

.

And its not just scientists who are convinced of this. The award-winning pianist Cassie Yukawa, 25, was introduced to the technique known as neurofeedback treatment at the Royal College of Music. I was introduced to Professor John Gruzelier [a psychologist then at Imperial College], and he said he was going to change my brain, which sounded very exciting like The Matrix, she says.

.

Seven years on, she is in no doubt that the theory works. It has had a wonderful impact on my life, enhancing my general feeling of wellbeing, she says. And I have no doubt that it has had a positive effect on my performances. It is about a state of mind; I am now far more willing to be flexible in my playing. It enabled me to think about and explore performance.

.

During treatment, sensors are placed on the scalp and ears to monitor the electrical activity in the brain or brainwaves. High-frequency brainwaves occur when you are very alert and agitated, whereas lowerfrequency brainwaves dominate during relaxation or sleep. The sensors are hooked up to a computer, producing a graph that looks not unlike a heartbeat pattern.

.

The aim is to push the brain into a state of near-sleep to produce the slow rhythms, known as theta waves, associated with this state. Its the kind of relaxed state in which ideas often come to you. It occurs naturally if, say, you are driving on a motorway and realise that you dont remember the previous few minutes.

.

Full article in the Belfast Telegraph

Advertisements